Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A pot or mug for holding ale. In England a pot of beer or ale means a quart of it; hence, ale-pot means especially a quart-pot.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And a few girls to squeeze with the hand not busy squeezing the ale-pot?

    Wizard and Glass

  • Mogue spent his time with the ballad-singers and the story-tellers around the market-stake, and when he came back to his tent he wanted to drink ale and go to sleep, but Flann turned him from the ale-pot by saying to him, "I want the Comb of Magnificence from you, Mogue."

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • Mogue drank and drank out of the ale-pot, frowning to himself.

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • He put the ale-pot away and said, "I suppose your life won't be any good to you unless I give you the Comb of Magnificence?"

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • By-and-by the old man had noticed a crowd gathered at one part of the fair-ground, and, snuffing a fight, had gone running, ale-pot in hand.

    Men of Iron

  • One evening Martin went with his clay pipe and his pewter ale-pot in his hand to the village inn, to divert himself listening to the general gossip which was carried on there between the host and the little group of customers -- weavers, tinkers, tailors, blacksmiths and labourers.

    Fifty-Two Stories For Girls

  • All the payings we pay is to pay the good ale-pot.

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 6

  • He stamped on the floor, and in a few seconds afterwards Moniplies appeared, wiping from his beard and mustaches the crumbs of bread, and the froth of the ale-pot, which plainly showed how he had been employed.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • “but the interest you take in my misfortunes seems sincere, and therefore — —” He stamped on the floor, and in a few seconds afterwards Moniplies appeared, wiping from his beard and mustaches the crumbs of bread, and the froth of the ale-pot, which plainly showed how he had been employed. — “Will your lordship grant permission,” said Heriot, “that I ask your groom a few questions?”

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • a crowd gathered at one part of the fair-ground, and, snuffing a fight, had gone running, ale-pot in hand.

    Men of Iron

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