Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of alguazil.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • While the old woman was thus haranguing, with all the prudence that old age and experience furnish, a small bark entered the harbor, in which was an alcayde and his alguazils.

    Candide

  • The great point is that an entire people be not despoiled by an army of alguazils, in order that a score of town or court leeches may feast upon its blood.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Spain of pimping barbers, sharking alguazils, and corrupt alcaldes, they may be sought after; but if they have to wait until such time for their deliverance, there is danger of their enchantment enduring until doomsday.

    The Alhambra

  • In fact, I doubt whether this jealousy about their blood has not kept them so poor in purse: spending all their earnings on escribanos and alguazils.

    The Alhambra

  • In fact, I doubt whether this jealousy about their blood has not kept them so poor in purse: spending all their earnings on escribanos and alguazils.

    The Alhambra

  • My house stripped and plundered by lawyers and alguazils; my husband a do-no-good, that no longer brings home bread to his family, but goes rambling about day and night, with infidel Moors!

    The Alhambra

  • My house stripped and plundered by lawyers and alguazils; my husband a do-no-good, that no longer brings home bread to his family, but goes rambling about day and night, with infidel Moors!

    The Alhambra

  • Spain of pimping barbers, sharking alguazils, and corrupt alcaldes, they may be sought after; but if they have to wait until such time for their deliverance, there is danger of their enchantment enduring until doomsday.

    The Alhambra

  • We informed our _alguazils_ that we had mules coming, and wanted _sacate_ for them.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 33, July, 1860

  • The people of Goascoran stared at us as we rode through their streets, but none came near us until after we had vigorously pounded the magical drum, when the _alguazils_ made their appearance, followed by all the urchins of the place, and by a crowd of lean and hungry curs, -- the latter evidently in watery-mouthed anticipation of obtaining from the strangers, what they seldom got at home, a stray crust or a marrow-bone.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 33, July, 1860

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