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Examples

  • The bordels of boys (pueris alienis adhæseverunt) appear to have been near the Temple.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • [5794] If her face be filthy by nature, she will mend it by art, alienis et adscititiis imposturis, which who can endure?

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Pliny, the naturalist, says: “Coccyx ova subdit in nidis alienis; ita plerique alienas uxores faciunt matres” — “the cuckoo deposits its eggs in the nest of other birds; so the Romans not unfrequently made mothers of the wives of their friends.”

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Quicquid ubique bene dictum facio meum, et illud nunc meis ad compendium, nunc ad fidem et auctoritatem alienis exprimo verbis, omnes auctores meos clientes esse arbitror, &c. Sarisburiensis ad Polycrat. prol.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Si pergit alienis negotiis operam dare sui negligens, erit alius mihi orator qui rem meam agat.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Nec aranearum textus ideo melior quia ex se fila gignuntur, nec noster ideo vilior, quia ex alienis libamus ut apes.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Ut nervis alienis mobile lignum — Ducitur — Hor. Lib.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Hic arcentur haerediatatibus liberi, hic donatur bonis alienis, falsum consulit, alter testamentum corrumpit, &c.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • For to speak in a word, envy is nought else but Tristitia de bonis alienis, sorrow for other men's good, be it present, past, or to come: et gaudium de adversis, and [1697] joy at their harms, opposite to mercy, [1698] which grieves at other men's mischances, and misaffects the body in another kind; so

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Senioribus mos est, si forte gentium plurium castra appropinquant, viros noctu huic inde transeuntes, uxoribus alienis uti et in sua castra ex utraque parte mane redire.

    An account of the manners and customs of the Aborigines and the state of their relations with Europeans, by Edward John Eyre

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