Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of allotment.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We Hidatsas and our friends, the Mandans, have also been removed from our village at Like-a-fishhook bend, and made to take our land in allotments; so that our old agriculture has in a measure fallen into disuse.

    Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden

  • Rights advocates also condemned the relocation site, which they described as allotments resembling brick shells and far from complete. brutal eviction in the heart of Phnom Penh without any apparent plan for relocation or meeting the humanitarian needs of the evictees, "Pred said.

    KI Media

  • The fields surrounding the allotments were a hive of activity, 2 tractors were ploughing at a great rate.

    Irish Blogs

  • The fields surrounding the allotments were a hive of activity, 2 tractors were ploughing at a great rate.

    Irish Blogs

  • A request has also been put forward to Cardiff Council on their Section 106 agreements for growing land (such as allotments).

    Cardiff today - The Dairy design hub opens and freedom of information

  • After years of protection by a Congress controlled in part by Southern Democrats, the program created "allotments" allowing tobacco growing in areas of only about four acres.

    Tobacco corruption in Virginia

  • There is a fresh grave dug in the deserted allotments which is a bit spooky.

    Archive 2007-03-18

  • Then presently our railway crossed a high road, and a row of mean yellow brick houses -- workmen's cottages, and the filthy black sheds that made the "allotments" of that time a universal eyesore, marked our approach to the more central areas of -- I quote the local guidebook -- "one of the most delightful resorts in the East Anglian poppy-land."

    In the Days of the Comet

  • In Britain, there is a long and honorable tradition of local councils’ leasing small plots of land, called allotments, to people without gardens of their own who may grow fruit, vegetables, and flowers upon them.

    Burglars Welcome! « Anglican Samizdat

  • In Britain, there is a long and honorable tradition of local councils’ leasing small plots of land, called allotments, to people without gardens of their own who may grow fruit, vegetables, and flowers upon them.

    2008 October « Anglican Samizdat

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