Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A name applied in Guam, the Philippines, and Porto Rico to Terminalia Catappa, the nuts of which somewhat resemble almonds in shape and flavor. See Terminalia, and country almonds, under almond.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In El Salvador it is known as almendro de rio or river almond because its fruits are similar to the fruits of Terminalia catappa (beach almond).

    Chapter 35

  • Logging and clearing of remaining forests threaten many species of slow-growing trees, such as the almendro and monkey pot tree.

    Isthmian-Pacific moist forests

  • The almendro (Dipteryx panamensis) and the monkey pot tree (Lecythis ampla) are two outstanding and rapidly disappearing canopy emergents, which are regional endemics of the lowlands, below 250 m.

    Isthmian-Pacific moist forests

  • Minister Dobles denied on Oct. 27 before the legislature that the green macaw nests in Las Crucitas, noting that the concentration of the almendro tree is not significant in that area.

    EcoEarth.Info Environment RSS Newsfeed

  • Minister Dobles denied on Oct. 27 before the legislature that the green macaw nests in Las Crucitas, noting that the concentration of the almendro tree is not significant in that area.

    IPS Inter Press Service

  • Costa Rica, which has protected the almendro tree by law, is party to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

    EcoEarth.Info Environment RSS Newsfeed

  • Minister Dobles denied on Oct. 27 before the legislature that the green macaw nests in Las Crucitas, noting that the concentration of the almendro tree is not significant in that area.

    Water Conserve: Water Conservation RSS Newsfeed

  • The tree is known in Spanish as the almendro amarillo, and it has the Latin name of Dipteryx panamensis.

    EcoEarth.Info Environment RSS Newsfeed

  • The almendro tree was not commercially viable until the introduction of special carbon steel blades about 25 years ago due to the density of the wood.

    EcoEarth.Info Environment RSS Newsfeed

  • Other dominant species in the dry forest zone are the hualtaco (Loxopterigium huasango), guayacán (Tabebbuia billbergii), palo santo (Bursera graveolens), ébano (Ziziphus thyrsiflora), charán (Caesalpinea corymbosa), sapote (Capparis angulata), pasallo (Bombax discolor), angolo (Pitthecellobium multiflorum), and almendro (Geoffroya striata).

    Tumbes-Piura dry forests

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