Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of alme.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A religious Friar of S. Anthonies Order, named Friar Onyon, had long time used to resort thither, to receive the benevolent almes, which those charitably affected people in simplicity gave him, and chiefly at divers daies of the year, when their bounty and devotion would extend themselves more largely then at other seasons.

    The Decameron

  • Being entred into the City, and in the poore estate of beggars, they craved every bodies mercy and almes.

    The Decameron

  • Answere was made, that he was a poore mans Son, that every day came for an almes to his gate.

    The Decameron

  • Good Woman, you goe and come very often, and still you are served with almes.

    The Decameron

  • Madani (quoth hee) a poore labouring man, who is both deafe and dumbe, hither he came to crave an almes the other day, the which in charity I could do no lesse but give him; for which, hee hath done many honest services about the house.

    The Decameron

  • I make not any doubt, but almes-deedes and prayers, are very mighty; and prevailing meanes, to appease heavens anger for some sinnes committed; but if such as bestow them, did either see or know, to whom they give them: they would more warily keepe them, or else cast them before Swine, in regard they are altogether so unworthy of them.

    The Decameron

  • Wherefore, it being giuen vs to vnderstand, that we must bestow giftes vpon them, we caused certaine skinnes of beuers and other beastes to be bought with part of that money, which was giuen vpon almes to succour vs by the way.

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • Christians, and bestowe much almes, and are a very courteous and gentle people.

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • Thei scholden ben symple, meke and trewe, and fulle of almes dede, as Jhesu was, in whom thei trowe: but thei ben alle the contrarie, and evere enclyned to the evylle, and to don evylle.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • I have past through two and thirty gates of his Palace, even such as are here, and at every one I receyved an almes, without any knowledgement taken of me, either by him, or any of his followers: and heere I have past but through thirteene gates, and am there both acknowledged and taken.

    The Decameron

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