Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as alms-chest.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Social welfare services have proved especially important in convincing the multitudes of casual Hezbollah enthusiasts in Lebanon and across the Arab world who lend Hezbollah support in small ways: a donation in the Friday prayer alms-box, a vote on election day, attendance at a street rally.

    A Privilege to Die

  • There is a very singular aumbry or alms-box, formed in an oak bench-end near the door.

    The Cornwall Coast

  • The hospital is partly self-supporting, partly dependent upon voluntary aid, and in all the places of resort one sees the little alms-box with its eloquent appeal, "For I was sick, and ye visited me not."

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 12, No. 32, November, 1873

  • Baroness Dinati was now taking up the collection for the poor, holding the long pole of the alms-box in her little, dimpled hands, and bowing with a pretty smile as the coins rattled into the receptacle.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • The chapel in the north-east corner contains an alms-box and

    What to See in England

  • During all this earlier period offereings in money do not seem to have been connected with the Sacrifice of the Mass, but they were either put into an alms-box permanently set up in the church or they were given in collections made on certain specified occasions.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • The sources from which the Church derived its receipts for poor-relief were: the surplus of the oblations at the Offertory of the Mass, the offerings of alms (Collecta) at the beginning of the service, the alms-box, the firstlings for the support of the clergy, the tithes

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • One typical tragic scene was that in New York, where, within sight of the City Hall, a lineman was killed at his work on the arc light pole, and his body slowly roasted before the gaze of the excited populace, which for days afterward dropped its silver and copper coin into the alms-box nailed to the fatal pole for the benefit of his family.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 1

  • Close to where she stood an alms-box clamped to the stone wall had written upon it the familiar legend, "Pour les Pauvres."

    The End of Her Honeymoon

  • One typical tragic scene was that in New York, where, within sight of the City Hall, a lineman was killed at his work on the arc light pole, and his body slowly roasted before the gaze of the excited populace, which for days afterward dropped its silver and copper coin into the alms-box nailed to the fatal pole for the benefit of his family.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions

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