Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various mushrooms in the genus Amanita, many of which are extremely poisonous. Amanitas have white spores and usually a ring around the stalk and a rounded bulb at the base.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In mycology, a genus of fungi of the family Agaricaceæ, restricted by recent authors to white-spored species having the stem provided with both an annulus, or ring, and a volva. Over 50 species have been described, a number of which are common and widely distributed throughout temperate regions.
  • noun [lowercase] A plant of this genus.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A genus of poisonous fungi of the family Agaricaceæ, characterized by having a volva, an annulus, and white spores. The species resemble edible mushrooms, and are frequently mistaken for them. Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius, is the fly amanita, or fly agaric; and Agaricus phalloides is the death cup (or death cap).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of very many agaric mushrooms, of the genus Amanita, most of which are very poisonous

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun genus of widely distributed agarics that have white spores and are poisonous with few exceptions

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[New Latin Amānīta, genus name, from Greek amānītai, a fungus.]

Examples

  • Just two months ago, the Chronicle reported on three members of a Bay Area family — a grandmother and two preteen boys — that had been hospitalized after harvesting and eating amanita phalloida (aka “death cap”) mushrooms, a sister species to the kind that killed the Santa Barbara octogenarian.

    When Urban Gleaning Goes Wrong « Scavenging

  • The man had picked poisonous amanita ocreata mushrooms, which are common in the Santa Barbara area, at the Douglas Family Preserve above Arroyo Burro Beach.

    2009 March 10 « Scavenging

  • The man had picked poisonous amanita ocreata mushrooms, which are common in the Santa Barbara area, at the Douglas Family Preserve above Arroyo Burro Beach.

    When Urban Gleaning Goes Wrong « Scavenging

  • Just two months ago, the Chronicle reported on three members of a Bay Area family — a grandmother and two preteen boys — that had been hospitalized after harvesting and eating amanita phalloida (aka “death cap”) mushrooms, a sister species to the kind that killed the Santa Barbara octogenarian.

    2009 March 10 « Scavenging

  • The Jew said, Maybe the word is ‘amanita,’ a poisonous mushroom.

    The Book of Unholy Mischief

  • I wanted to believe it was a love potion but … could that dried bit have been amanita?

    The Book of Unholy Mischief

  • I wanted to believe it was a love potion but … could that dried bit have been amanita?

    The Chef’s Apprentice

  • I wanted to believe it was a love potion but … could that dried bit have been amanita?

    The Chef’s Apprentice

  • The Jew said, Maybe the word is ‘amanita,’ a poisonous mushroom.

    The Chef’s Apprentice

  • Milk thistle has been used as an effective treatment for amanita mushroom poisoning, which kills its victim by destroying the liver.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

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