Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The character or position of an amateur.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The quality or character of an amateur.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The quality or character of an amateur.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

amateur +‎ -ship

Examples

  • I have remarked this excessive wine-amateurship especially in youth.

    The Book of Snobs

  • The shallow amateurship of the circle of their patrons early disgusts them with theories; they shrink back to the hard teaching of their own industry, and would rather read the book which facilitated their methods than the one that rationalized their aims.

    On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

  • Political amateurship was now so popular in England, that he might easily enough pass off for one of those 'Bulls' desirous to make himself up on the Greek question.

    Lord Kilgobbin

  • I have remarked this excessive wine-amateurship especially in youth.

    The Book of Snobs

  • They fall also under the benefit of another principle -- the conservative feeling of amateurship.

    Memorials and Other Papers — Complete

  • They fall also under the benefit of another principle -- the conservative feeling of amateurship.

    Memorials and Other Papers — Volume 1

  • The hot blood which excites, and the adventurous courage which accompanies, the excesses of sanguinary warfare, presuppose a condition of the moral nature not to be compared for malignity and baleful tendency to the cool and cowardly spirit of amateurship, in which the Roman (perhaps an effeminate Asiatic) sat looking down upon the bravest of men,

    The Caesars

  • Helen; and that, to prevent disputes, he would make the distribution of them himself now, and in the kindest and most playful manner he allotted them to each, always finding some excellent reason for giving to Helen those which he knew she liked best; and then there was to be a _hanging committee_, for hanging the pictures, which occasioned a great deal of talking, Beauclerc always thinking most of Helen, or of what was really best for the paintings; Horace most of himself and his amateurship.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 10

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.