Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun US The result of making an amendment to a document etc; an amendment

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • FURTHER UPDATE: Glenn Greenwald, showing his usual perspicacity about all things Israeli, still has on his website, without correction [or amendation, even?]: “Those on the ships emphatically state that the IDF came on board shooting.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Pro-Palestinian “Peace Activists”

  • The hypo was, if Welker is correct that if you think something is evil, depraved, or, with your amendation, has very bad social consequences, does that mean that you necessarily think it should be illegal.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The “Racist” Charge

  • It contends that the course of events should and must necessarily mould a great and successful nation's progress; that the policies of our fathers were never formulated for all time; and that they themselves recognized it, and made requisite allowance for constitutional amendation.

    The Principles of the Republican Party: A Rare Unpublished Jack London Essay

  • FURTHER UPDATE: Glenn Greenwald, showing his usual perspicacity about all things Israeli, still has on his website, without correction or amendation, even?

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Pro-Palestinian “Peace Activists”

  • The hypo was, if Welker is correct that if you think something is evil, depraved, or, with your amendation, has very bad social consequences, does that mean that you necessarily think it should be illegal.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The “Racist” Charge

  • Brown (I kept Teresa's amendation to the award title, here.)

    madder rose

  • But that is a civil taboo, rather than a fixed amendation of our constitution.

    Citadel

  • The second edition of Agnes Grey was prepared after her death, with considerable editorial amendation by her sister Charlotte.

    Agnes Grey

  • But once again we will try to find the right way by the glimmer of Hanmer's amendation, who reads thus,

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • II. i.54 (38,3) [they wear themselves in the cap of the time, there, do muster true gait] [W: to muster] I think this amendation cannot be said to give much light to the obscurity of the passage.

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

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