Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Impervious to the effect of a magnetic field; resistant to magnetization.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. unable to be magnetized; unaffected by a magnetic field

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. impervious to the effects of a magnetic field; resistant to magnetization

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was like an antimagnetic thing, and I was a piece of metal.

    Dark Dude

  • Sanyo Fashions 'new raincoat sports purpose-built, antimagnetic-shielded pockets for cellphones, PDAs, plane tix, shades, wallets, etc -- all labelled for clarity.

    Boing Boing: April 8, 2001 - April 14, 2001 Archives

  • The double-barreled handgun simultaneously fired a thermo-beam along with a stream of antimagnetic plastic bullets.

    The Emperor and the Monster

  • However there were disadvantages to such a 'hardened' field structure when under attack by high-impact antimagnetic missiles.

    Duel Under the Double Sun

  • By the ingenious means of using antimagnetic missiles Rhodan succeeded in breaking down the protective body screens of the Antis and invading their fortress.

    False Front

  • "At any rate," said Smith, "we know that the confounded stuff isn't antimagnetic, whatever it is."

    The Lord of Death and the Queen of Life

  • It's waterproof, anti-shock, antimagnetic and colourfast.

    TravelPod.com TravelStream™ — Recent Entries at TravelPod.com

  • There's also the ecru-stitched black leather band with (decorative) rivets, matte-finished case (a shiny case is bad in a plane, the reflections are distracting), as well as the invisible antimagnetic case and dial.

    Watch Report

  • Thus, if you move slowly and carefully, the spheres will just kind of roll along the "antimagnetic field," as it were.

    Jay is Games

  • The residents are antimagnetic, as are Gallagher's colleagues Drs. Belle and Hayden-Jones.

    The New Yorker

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