Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Total or partial loss of the ability to perform coordinated movements or manipulate objects in the absence of motor or sensory impairment.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In pathology, loss of the knowledge of the uses of things.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun inability to make purposeful movements, but without paralysis or loss of sensory function.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Total or partial loss of the ability to perform coordinated movements or manipulate objects in the absence of motor or sensory impairment; specifically, a disorder of motor planning.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun inability to make purposeful movements

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Greek aprāxiā, inaction : a-, without; see a– + prāxis, action; see praxis.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek ἀπραξία (apraksia, "inaction").

Examples

  • We took him to the doctors, the developmental pediatricians, and they said oh, he has something called apraxia, which is a fancy label for a speech delay.

    CNN Transcript Mar 25, 2007

  • We took him to the doctors, the developmental pediatricians, and they said oh, he has something called apraxia, which is a fancy label for a speech delay.

    CNN Transcript Mar 21, 2007

  • We took him to the doctors, the developmental pediatricians, and they said oh, he has something called apraxia, which is a fancy label for a speech delay.

    CNN Transcript Mar 31, 2007

  • And apraxia, which is often caused by a stroke, is a serious disorder that disrupts neural programming and often leaves its patients unable to speak at all.

    GEORGE W. Bushisms

  • And apraxia, which is often caused by a stroke, is a serious disorder that disrupts neural programming and often leaves its patients unable to speak at all.

    GEORGE W. Bushisms

  • His mind remains sharp but he contends with a disorder called apraxia, which affects his speech.

    Sand Mountain Reporter: News

  • His mind remains sharp but he contends with a disorder called apraxia, which affects his speech.

    Sand Mountain Reporter: News

  • His mind remains sharp but he contends with a disorder called apraxia, which affects his speech.

    Sand Mountain Reporter: News

  • His mind remains sharp but he contends with a disorder called apraxia, which affects his speech.

    Sand Mountain Reporter: News

  • His mind remains sharp but he contends with a disorder called apraxia, which affects his speech.

    Sand Mountain Reporter: News

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