Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An English publication (as title, Army List), issued periodically, containing a list of the officers in the army, the stations of regiments, etc. In the United States there is a similar list, called the Army Register.
  • noun Figuratively, the officers whose names are recorded in the list.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Why should the country reserve its gratitude for the genteel occupiers of the army-list, and forget the gallant fellows whose humble names were written in the regimental books?

    Little Travels and Roadside Sketches

  • If the same remark applies to the members of the army-list, as well as to those of the navy and law, we must say that it is an extremely shabby method of

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, October 2, 1841

  • No rent-roll nor army-list can dignify skulking and dissimulation: and the first point of courtesy must always be truth, as really all the forms of good-breeding point that way.

    XII. Essays. Manners. 1844

  • Waverley, however, justly concluded that this good lady had the whole army-list by heart; and, to avoid detection, by adhering to truth, answered --- ` ` Gardiner's dragoons, ma'am; but I have retired some time. ''

    The Waverley

  • In 1752 his name was struck off the Prussian army-list.

    Chips From A German Workshop. Vol. III. Essays on Literature, Biography, and Antiquities

  • No rentroll nor army-list can dignify skulking and dissimulation: and the first point of courtesy must always be truth, as really all the forms of good-breeding point that way.

    Essays: Second Series (1844)

  • No rent roll nor army-list can dignify skulking and dissimulations: and the first point of courtesy must always be truth, as really all forms of good-breeding point that way.

    Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • No rentroll nor army-list can dignify skulking and dissimulation; and the first point of courtesy must always be truth, as really all the forms of good-breeding point that way.

    Essays — Second Series

  • The thing went on admirably, till one day, some few months later, they saw, in a confounded army-list, that the late

    Charles O'Malley — Volume 1

  • Why should the country reserve its gratitude for the genteel occupiers of the army-list, and forget the gallant fellows whose humble names were written in the regimental books?

    Little Travels and Roadside Sketches

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