Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In surgery, the opening of an artery by the lancet or other instrument, for the purpose of letting blood.
  • noun That part of the science of anatomy which treats of the dissection of the arteries.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Med.) The opening of an artery, esp. for bloodletting.
  • noun That part of anatomy which treats of the dissection of the arteries.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun medicine The opening of an artery, especially for bloodletting.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin arteriotomia.

Examples

  • That it is blood and blood alone which is contained in the arteries is made manifest by the experiment of Galen, by arteriotomy, and by wounds; for from a single divided artery, as

    The Harvard Classics Volume 38 Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology)

  • And if the arteries take in and cast out air in the systole and diastole, like the lungs in the process of respiration, why do they not do the same thing when a wound is made in one of them, as in the operation of arteriotomy?

    Introduction

  • That it is blood and blood alone which is contained in the arteries is made manifest by the experiment of Galen, by arteriotomy, and by wounds; for from a single divided artery, as Galen himself affirms in more than one place, the whole of the blood may be withdrawn in the course of half an hour or less.

    Introduction

  • But the contrary is obvious in arteriotomy and in wounds; for the blood spurting from the arteries escapes with force, now farther, now not so far, alternately, or in jets; and the jet always takes place with the diastole of the artery, never with the systole.

    Introduction

  • In the same way, when we see the blood in arteriotomy projected now to a greater, now to a less distance, and that the greater jet corresponds to the diastole of the artery and to the time when the heart contracts and strikes the ribs, and is in its state of systole, we understand that the blood is expelled by the same movement.

    III. Of the Motions of the Arteries, as seen in the Dissection of Living Animals

  • He opposed arteriotomy for this reason, and refused to employ extensive cauterization.

    Old-Time Makers of Medicine The Story of The Students And Teachers of the Sciences Related to Medicine During the Middle Ages

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