Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of arum.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One simple solution is for the flower to generate heat, and here the arums are the kings: eastern skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) can keep its flowers above 59F (15C) when the air temperature is 5F (-15C), and can often be seen melting the snow around it.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • A 1933 view of a young girl with Shirley Temple curls, "Portrait de mademoiselle Poum Rachou," sold for $4.9 million and a still life with calla lilies, "Arlette Boucard aux arums," sold for $1.4 million.

    Sotheby's $61.3 Million Sale Disappoints; Picasso Goes Unsold

  • Those twelve chief barons to stand by duedesmally with their folded arums and put down all excursions and false alarums and after that to go back now to their runameat farums and re-compile their magnum chartarums with the width of the road between them and all harrums.

    Finnegans Wake

  • He made mysterious walks, bordered by tropical and European plants, amongst which the most striking to an English eye were enormous arums with leaves five feet long and three broad, and acacias, mimosas, umbrella trees in full flower.

    The Romance of Isabel Lady Burton

  • It is here quite dry; it went through endless woods; about as broad as a Devonshire lane, here and there crossed by fallen trees; huge trees overhead in the sun, dripping lianas and tufted with orchids, tree ferns, ferns depending with air roots from the steep banks, great arums

    Vailima Letters

  • The flower, called a titan arums or “corpse flower,” apparently has a terrible smell - hence the name?

    Links by the bushel!

  • Like other arums, taro contains protective crystalline needles of calcium oxalate 40–160 mg per 100 gm, and deposits them near stores of protein-digesting enzymes.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Taro is sometimes confused with malanga, yautia, and cocoyam, tubers of a number of New World tropical species in the genus Xanthosoma, which are also arums protected by oxalate crystals.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Like other arums, taro contains protective crystalline needles of calcium oxalate 40–160 mg per 100 gm, and deposits them near stores of protein-digesting enzymes.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Taro is sometimes confused with malanga, yautia, and cocoyam, tubers of a number of New World tropical species in the genus Xanthosoma, which are also arums protected by oxalate crystals.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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