Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A crystallized substance (C4H8N2O3) found in the juice of asparagus, beets, and other vegetables, in the sprouts of cereals, and in leguminous seeds during germination.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The substance called asparagin which it contains is supposed to possess some value.

    Public School Domestic Science

  • The chemical analysis of its juice discovers its composition to be a peculiar crystallizable principle, called asparagin, albumen, mannite, malic acid, and some salts.

    The Book of Household Management

  • The chemical analysis of its juice discovers its composition to be a peculiar crystallizable principle, called asparagin, albumen, mannite, malic acid, and some salts.

    The Book of Household Management

  • Clare, one of his characters in _Clarisse_ say: "Liebig, or some other scientist maintains that asparagin -- the alkaloid in asparagus-develops _form_ in the human brain: so, if you get hold of an artistic child, and give him plenty of asparagus, he will grow into a second Raffaelle!"

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • An infusion made with cold water takes up the mucilage, sugar, and asparagin, then the hot water dissolves the starch.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • Laboratory experiments have also been carried out on such different nitrogenous substances as ethylamine, thiocyanates, gelatin, urea, asparagin, and albuminoids of milk.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • This asparagin stimulates the kidneys, and imparts a peculiar, strong smell to the urine after taking the shoots; at the same time, the green resin with which the asparagin is combined, exercises gently sedative effects on the heart, calming palpitation, or nervous excitement of that organ.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • Asparagus contains, too, an amid compound, asparagin, which gives some of the characteristics to the vegetable.

    Human Foods and Their Nutritive Value

  • Chemically, the root [320] contains a special kind of sugar, glycyrrhizine, a demulcent starch, asparagin, phosphate and malate of lime and magnesia, a resinous oil, albumen, and woody fibre.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • The shoots, whether wild or cultivated, are succulent, and contain wax, albumen, acetate of potash, phosphate of potash, mannite, a green resin, and a fixed principle named "asparagin."

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

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