Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to an aspect.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to grammatical aspect.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or belonging to an aspect (as an aspect of the verb)

Etymologies

aspect +‎ -ual (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In other words, rather than reconstructing a separate voice, we might simply place the middle in a different aspectual category under the subjective distinct from the *r-less "proto-perfect" and further treat it as the marked "presentive" form of the subjective.

    Interesting quirks of a PIE subjective-objective model

  • So let's remodel the above into a new, purely aspectual system which might better account for everything, including Anatolian this time:

    The active-stative mess

  • Later, as the system settled into a new tensual contrast, any aspectual distinctions between the mi-class and hi-class dissolved since the only thing that mattered now, grammatically speaking, was past and present-future (ie. when an action occurred), not the aspect (ie. how an action occurred).

    Looking for a simple origin to Hittite's hi-class preterite

  • (13 Aug 2009) Just noticed something I might want to rearrange with better clarity: We can then take note of an interesting aspectual contrast between *bʰḗr-mi 'I am/was carrying' with no specific event being conveyed (potentially habitual), and the semelfactivizing quality of the sigmatic form *bʰḗr-s-m̥ 'I have carried (once)' ...

    Looking for a simple origin to Hittite's hi-class preterite

  • We can then take note of an interesting aspectual contrast between *bʰḗr-m̥ 'I carry/carried' with no specific event being conveyed (potentially habitual), and the semelfactivizing quality of the sigmatic form *bʰḗr-s-m̥ 'I have carried (once)', acting essentially like a perfective for inherently durative verbs.

    Looking for a simple origin to Hittite's hi-class preterite

  • Instead I'd like to suggest that it derives from a Mid IE aspectual marker *-ɢ̰a-, which originally might have conveyed a perfective sense.

    Back to business: emphatic particles and verbal extensions

  • In British English, an aspectual distinction is usually involved.

    On boilt

  • IEists for example volley terms about like "aorist" (aspectual or tensal?) and "markedness" (phonetic or inflectional?) within a variety of sometimes contradictory contexts and it's important to recognize the shades of subtlety.

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • Thinking less "transitive" and more aspectual, the use of *-mi would be because of its inchoative nature.

    Thoughts on the early Indo-European subjunctive 1ps ending

  • Notice that the aspectual nuance varies with the kind of verb.

    Archive 2007-10-01

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