Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of asphalt.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • What then, to whom then do you adherent in these most awful asphalts?

    Berkeley Stations

  • If we take it away we will have cracking asphalts and bad bridges.

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  • Amory wondered how people could fail to notice that he was a boy marked for glory, and when faces of the throng turned toward him and ambiguous eyes stared into his, he assumed the most romantic of expressions and walked on the air cushions that lie on the asphalts of fourteen.

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  • · Paving of courtyards and other outdoor surfaces, walkways, etc. with sulfurized asphalts.

    Chapter 4

  • · Sulphurized asphalts, in which either the aggregate or the asphalt (as used in road and pavement construction) is partially replaced by sulphur, thus raising the viscosity at high temperatures or lowering it at lower temperatures.

    Chapter 4

  • · Sulfurized asphalts can be stronger and cheaper than standard paving materials.

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  • Such mixtures differ in degree only from the mixtures used for asphalt street paving, for discussion of which the various books on paving and asphalts should be consulted.

    Concrete Construction Methods and Costs

  • From these facts we might fairly infer that asphalts formed in geological ages anterior to the present would exhibit characters resulting from still further distillation; that they would be harder and drier, i.e., containing less volatile ingredients and more fixed carbon.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882

  • Such is, in fact, the case; and these older asphalts are represented by _Grahamite, Albertite_, etc., which I have designated as asphaltic coals.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882

  • The asphalts, then, have a common history in this, that they are produced by the evaporation and oxidation of petroleum.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882

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