Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality of being associable.
  • noun In pathology, the property of suffering changes by sympathy, or of being affected by the condition of other parts of the body.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The quality of being associable, or capable of association; associableness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The condition of being associable

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the capability of being easily associated or joined or connected in thought

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Chief Problems for which solutions were sought in the following experimental study were: (1) Those of associability in general, its characteristics, and the rapidity of learning; (2) of discrimination, including the parts played in associative processes by the different senses, and the delicacy of discrimination in each; (3) of the modifiability of associational reactions and general adaptation in the frog, and (4) of the permanency of associations.

    Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 Containing Sixteen Experimental Investigations from the Harvard Psychological Laboratory.

  • These four faculties of the sensorium during their inactive state are termed irritability, sensibility, voluntarity, and associability; in their active state they are termed as above irritation, sensation, volition, association.

    Note II

  • In which latter situation the accumulation of the sensorial power of irritation increases by its superabundance the associability of the fibres of the stomach, so as to overbalance the defect of the excitement of their association.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • From whence it appears that the propensity to action, whether it be called irritability, sensibility, voluntarity, or associability, is only another mode of expression for the quantity of sensorial power residing in the organ to be excited.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Where this fever is continued, though with some remissions and exacerbations, the excessive action is at length so much lessened by expenditure of sensorial power, as to gradually terminate in health; or it becomes totally exhausted, and death succeeds the destruction of the irritability and associability of the system.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • This torpor of the general system remains, till the accumulation of the sensorial power of association has increased the associability so much as to overbalance the defect of the excitement of association; then the torpor ceases, and if the first affected part has recovered its activity the other parts are all thrown into excess of action by their increased associability, and the hot fit of fever is produced.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • These four faculties of the sensorium during their inactive state are termed irritability, sensibility, voluntarity, and associability; in their active state they are termed as above, irritation, sensation, volition, association.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • These four faculties of the sensorium during their inactive state are termed irritability, sensibility, voluntarily, and associability; in their active state they are termed as above irritation, sensation, volition, association.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

  • This last kind of fever recurs less frequently than the other, as it is a disease only of those of the temperament of associability, as mentioned in Sect.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Hence the exertion of the voluntary power in its natural degree diminishes the increased sensibility, and irritability, and probably the increased associability, which occurs during sleep; and thus reduces the frequency of the pulse in the feverish sleep after a full meal.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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