Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of assonance.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • From this point on all poets have this experience the sounds of the poem, the assonances and consonances, the rhythms, images dissolving into each other, carried the poem forward.

    The Best American Poetry 2010

  • From this point on all poets have this experience the sounds of the poem, the assonances and consonances, the rhythms, images dissolving into each other, carried the poem forward.

    The Best American Poetry 2010

  • From this point on all poets have this experience the sounds of the poem, the assonances and consonances, the rhythms, images dissolving into each other, carried the poem forward.

    The Best American Poetry 2010

  • Sensuous rhythms and rich assonances of diction governs this voice whose role resembles that of a Greek choir, as it speaks of the odyssey, evoking moral lessons while keeping action in constant flux and suspense.

    ONE AND TWENTY by PAAVO HAAVIKKO

  • This isn't to say that tonal music, the perfect C chord range with its logical assonances and dissonances, can't move us physically.

    More on music

  • This isn't to say that tonal music, the perfect C chord range with its logical assonances and dissonances, can't move us physically.

    Archive 2005-06-01

  • English prosody I value for its assonances, its rich range of grates, its rhythmic and connotative clashes... that is, the kind of English sonics I tend to love would fit startlingly well with shkrobius's early negative reactions.

    languagehat.com: CACOPHONY?

  • Then followed a discipline exacted, most drastically, by the fineness of his own ear — the weighing of cadences, the consideration of pauses; the effect of repetitions and consonances and assonances — all this was part of the duty of a writer who wishes to put a complex meaning fully and completely before his reader.

    The Common Reader, Second Series

  • Oh! You think that because I pass my life trying to make harmonious phrases, in avoiding assonances, that I too have not my little judgments on the things of this world?

    The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters

  • Goncourt is very happy when he has seized upon a word in the street that he can stick in a book, and I am well satisfied when I have written a page without assonances or repetitions.

    The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters

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