Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who or that which astonishes.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It would, probably, have disappeared in the natural course of events, before the railroad between Leghorn and Pisa, which is a good one, and has already begun to astonish Italy with a precedent of punctuality, order, plain dealing, and improvement — the most dangerous and heretical astonisher of all.

    Pictures from Italy

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history.

    Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln in Reply to Senator Douglas

  • "I thought it would be an astonisher," said her father; "how are Grace and Eeny?"

    Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters A Novel

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history.

    The Great Conspiracy, Complete

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history.

    The Great Conspiracy, Volume 1

  • It would, probably, have disappeared in the natural course of events, before the railroad between Leghorn and Pisa, which is a good one, and has already begun to astonish Italy with a precedent of punctuality, order, plain dealing, and improvement -- the most dangerous and heretical astonisher of all.

    Pictures from Italy

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Abraham Lincoln Writings

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history.

    The Writings of Abraham Lincoln — Volume 3 The Lincoln-Douglas debates

  • The exclamation point (or "screamer" or "astonisher," as it is sometimes called in newspaper offices) is used sparingly in most writing because the statements that require it -- those containing a strong emotional charge -- are themselves relatively rare and because omitting the mark often produces a kind of understatement that is strong in itself.

    About.com Grammar & Composition

  • It is the first of its kind; it is an astonisher in legal history; it is a new wonder of the world; it is based upon falsehood in the main as to the facts, -- allegations of facts upon which it stands are not facts at all in many instances, -- and no decision made on any question -- the first instance of a decision made under so many unfavourable circumstances -- thus placed, has ever been held by the profession as law, and it has always needed confirmation before the lawyers regarded it as settled law; but Judge Douglas will have it that all hands must take this extraordinary decision made under these extraordinary circumstances and give their vote in Congress in accordance with it, yield to it, and obey it in every possible sense.

    Speeches and Letters of Abraham Lincoln, 1832-1865

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