Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Plural of astragalus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of astragalus.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Financial historian Peter Bernstein, who described the odd-shaped astragali in his classic on risk, "Against the Gods," wrote that "Knight's ideas are particularly relevant to financial markets, where all decisions reflect a forecast of the future and where surprise occurs regularly."

    Inherently Risky Business

  • M.E. Cohen The first game of dice, played by ancient Greeks, Romans and E.yptians, used astragali, animal ankle bones that are more oblong than square.

    Inherently Risky Business

  • It might have been supposed that, after playing with astragali, dice, and cards for several thousand years, man would have arrived relatively early at some con - cept of the laws of chance.

    CHANCE

  • These “astragali” have four clearly defined surfaces and were probably the antecedents of the ordinary six-faced cube or die, specimens of which are datable as far back as 3000 B.C.

    CHANCE

  • The volute is here quite simple in shape; elsewhere we find it doubled, as it were, so that four volutes occur between the astragali and the abacus

    A History of Art in Chaldæa & Assyria, v. 1

  • Under the volutes three rings, or _astragali_, may be seen.

    A History of Art in Chaldæa & Assyria, v. 1

  • The astragali, the ibex horns and the volutes, may all be easily recognized here.

    A History of Art in Chaldæa & Assyria, v. 1

  • These are the people who work the tin, which they melt into the form of astragali, and then carry it to an island in front of Britain, called

    Chips From A German Workshop. Vol. III. Essays on Literature, Biography, and Antiquities

  • We suggest that all three astragali represent very similar allosauroids and that NMVP 150070 is closest in morphology to Phylogenetic position of the three new dinosaurs.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • -- Albert Einstein Dicing dates from the Stone Age, when sheep knucklebones, astragali, were the primordial "rolling bones."

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XII No 3

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