Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of asymmetry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lagging technology, low rates of consumerism and weak agriculture, combined with tremendous overall "asymmetries" between the two national economies, are cited as the key reasons the deal will be bad for Colombia.

    National Union of Public and General Employees -

  • With these 'asymmetries' of information, the market may then no longer be 'efficient' at all, so that for example poor products can crowd out good ones.

    homunculus

  • Such asymmetries are even more evident in the context of today's financial crisis, where gender-differentiated impacts are expected to affect women more acutely than ever.

    Otaviano Canuto: How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks?

  • Although Johanna is aware of the meagerness of Georgia's allowance, she feels that the recent precipitous expansion of the neighborhood doll-housing market, coupled with the effects of informational asymmetries—namely, that Georgia can't really add yet—are enough to justify the risk.

    Report on the Recent Piggybanking Crisis

  • Activity that would be prosecutable as insider trading is a subset of all information asymmetries.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Goldman Fraud Suit

  • Such asymmetries are even more evident in the context of today's financial crisis, where gender-differentiated impacts are expected to affect women more acutely than ever.

    Otaviano Canuto: How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks?

  • Sans governmentes et l'argent, should we give a hoot about inter-regional asymmetries in trade?

    Whose Debt is it, Anyway?, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • Beyond a certain point, global banking offers few economies of scale and has not in fact reduced information asymmetries, research suggests.

    The Struggle Heats Up for Global Finance

  • Third, these steps would assist emerging economies to adjust to asymmetries in recoveries by relying on flexible exchange rates and independent monetary policies.

    The G20 Must Look Beyond Bretton Woods II

  • The globalization of banking over the past two decades was largely based on an assumption that money could move freely across borders, enabling banks to arbitrage information asymmetries—i.e. use their supposedly better understanding of risks to identify opportunities to allocate capital wherever in the world it could deliver the highest returns.

    The Struggle Heats Up for Global Finance

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