Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of avouch.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Upon this, he bowed his head groundwards awhile, then he raised his eyes to me and answered, Thou sayest sooth in avouching thyself a renowned knight and famed in fight and verily thou art the lion of the desert; but if ye all attack me treacherously and slay me in your wrath and take my sister by force, it will be a stain upon your honour.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • When our father died, he left us some money, which we shared amongst us, and he took his part of the inheritance and wasted it in frowardness and debauchery, till he was reduced to poverty, when he came upon us and cited us before the magistrates, avouching that we had taken his good and that of his father, and we disputed the matter before the judges and lost the money.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Bruno prepared a Charme or writing for him, avouching constantly to him, that so soone as he touched the

    The Decameron

  • What a shame is this base imperfection to thee, by rising and walking thus in the night-time, according as thy dreames doe wantonly delude thee, and cause thee to forsake thy bed, telling nothing but lies and fables, yet avouching them for manifest truthes?

    The Decameron

  • In testimony whereof, they shewed his Glove, avouching moreover, that neither by force (or otherwise) they would yeelde, or deliver him any thing which they had aboorde their Ship.

    The Decameron

  • Which accident pleasing her beyond all comparison, and applauding her good Fortune, to bee so happily delivered from their daily mollestation: she betooke her selfe to hir Chamber with the Maide, avouching solemnly to her, that

    The Decameron

  • Rougher Language growing betweene them, of his avouching, and her as stout denying, with defending her cause over-weakely, against the manifest proofes both of eye and eare: at last she fell on her knees before him, weeping incessantly, and no excuses now availing, she confest her long acquaintance with Spinelloccio, and most humbly entreated him to forgive her.

    The Decameron

  • All of them affirmed the contrarie, avouching rather, that some Impostumation had engendered neere his heart, which sodainly breaking, occasioned his as sodaine death.

    The Decameron

  • The diversitie of changes and alterations in Fortune as they are great, so must they needs be greevous; and as often as we take occasion to talke of them, so often do they awake and quicken our understandings, avouching, that it is no easie matter to depend upon her flatteries.

    The Decameron

  • The joyner denieth any sale thereof, avouching, that the last night it was stolne from his doore.

    The Decameron

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