Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun the state of being elsewhere than in particular place.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or condition of being away; distance; remoteness; absence; absenteeism.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the state of being elsewhere than in particular place

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From away +‎ -ness.

Examples

  • I didn't have words to describe the giddy sense of bigness, of far awayness, that overwhelmed me.

    She Sank Into the Sand

  • Well, this here comes from those times which seem oh so very far away now and seemingly forever moving in the direction of awayness as we get yet another series of the embarssing unimaginative deadness that is Shooting Stars.

    Vic Reeves & The Roman Numerals - Born Free (12")

  • In the spring I planted some exotic lettuce varieties, which were kind of sharp and went to seed during all my house-sitting awayness.

    Archive 2006-07-01

  • In the spring I planted some exotic lettuce varieties, which were kind of sharp and went to seed during all my house-sitting awayness.

    land of plenty

  • It had a wonder and a far – awayness, even here in the heart of Sydney.

    Kangaroo

  • His eyes had taken again the peculiar gleaming far-awayness, suspended between the realities, which, Kate suddenly realized, was the central look in the native eyes.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • However, there is a kind of awayness where the individual gives others the impression, whether warranted or not, that he is not aware that he is “away.”

    Behavior in Public Places

  • While the silent or brown study kind of awayness is perhaps the main type, other kinds are also observable.

    Behavior in Public Places

  • Certainly, at first, as one passes into the strange vestibule which intervenes still between the front and the interior of the shaîtya, one does not think at all -- one only _feels_ the dim sense of mildness raying out from the great faces of the elephants, and of mysterious far-awayness conveyed by the bizarre postures of the sculptured figures on the walls.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 097, January, 1876

  • If the - ness could be affixed as an abstractive element to each and every type of radical element, if we could say fightness (“the act or quality of fighting”) or waterness (“the quality or state of water”) or awayness (“the state of being away”) as we can say goodness (“the state of being good”), we should have moved appreciably nearer the agglutinative pole.

    Chapter 6. Types of Linguistic Structure

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