Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of baggageman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A good many minor people -- hotel baggagemen, clerks, etc., tram conductors, policemen and the like -- will seem to you to be monstrously rude and unobliging.

    Recollections With Photogravure Portrait of the Author and a number of Original Letters, of which one by George Meredith and another by Robert Louis Stevenson are reproduced in facsimile

  • She stood quietly by while Buck attended to their trunks, just as she had seen it done by hundreds of helpless little cotton-wool women who had never checked a trunk in their lives -- she, who had spent ten years of her life wrestling with trunks and baggagemen and porters.

    Emma McChesney and Co.

  • She couldn't know, of course, that Vincent went pouncing on ladies and baggagemen and office boys, and old friends, just the same way.

    The Brimming Cup

  • They descended from the car amid a pandemonium of porters, hackmen, soldiers, newsboys, distracted fellow-passengers, locomotives noisily blowing off steam, baggagemen trundling and slamming trunks about; and stood irresolute and confused.

    Ailsa Paige

  • Railway baggagemen and porters, with warning cries, pushed their trucks through the crowd.

    The Foreigner A Tale of Saskatchewan

  • The bells were rung as signals, and the station locked; the whole management -- ticket-agent, conductor and baggagemen -- then got upon the train and we were off.

    In Indian Mexico (1908)

  • They sent in trainmen, baggagemen, and hackmen; we resisted passively, and three seats to which we clung as they were dragging us along, were torn up before they got us out.

    Life of Rev. Thomas James : by himself,

  • However, it was still sound, that was a comfort, it was not battered in the least; the baggagemen seemed to be conscientiously careful, in Germany, of the baggage entrusted to their hands.

    A Tramp Abroad

  • The noise of the trains, the clangor of trucks, as they were whirled up and down the station platform by the baggagemen; the noise of the subway and surface cars, mingled with countless other sounds, were sufficient to distract any girl's attention, and Dorothy came out of her reverie and turned, only when Aunt Betty cried out from the car steps:

    Dorothy's Triumph

  • I have a notion I like brakemen and baggagemen better than conductors. "

    Seven Miles to Arden

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