Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An outlaw or bandit, specially of Spain or Mexico.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Spanish

Examples

  • Thanks to your recipe for inspiration, I have a new bullet in my bandolero.

    Austin and basic black beans | Homesick Texan

  • Decked out in a strange combination of biker denim and bandolero chic, both gangs now look anachronistic, almost romantic.

    80 Blocks From Tiffany's is a million miles from today's gang life

  • Sharing cyberspace with Kimberly is like being in class with that really smart girl who always shows up well-rested and prepared for tests with a row of sharpened No. 2 pencils lined up like .45 slugs on Pancho Villa's bandolero while I slither into the testing theater on three hours of sleep with a dried circle of Tang around my mouth.

    I'm in a recommending mood

  • Sometimes it struggles through rugged barrancos, or ravines, worn by winter torrents, the obscure path of the contrabandista; while, ever and anon, the ominous cross, the monument of robbery and murder, erected on a mound of stones at some lonely part of the road, admonishes the traveller that he is among the haunts of banditti, perhaps at that very moment under the eye of some lurking bandolero.

    The Alhambra

  • The couplets thus chanted, are often old traditional romances about the Moors, or some legend of a saint, or some love-ditty; or, what is still more frequent, some ballad about a bold contrabandista, or hardy bandolero, for the smuggler and the robber are poetical heroes among the common people of Spain.

    The Alhambra

  • UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: What's that, territorio bandolero?

    CNN Transcript Aug 20, 2001

  • For a sawbones he was a most complete little bandolero, I'll say that for him, but what he said gave me the blue fits straight off.

    Flashman In The Great Game

  • Sometimes it straggles through rugged barrancos, or ravines, worn by winter torrents, the obscure path of the contrabandista; while, ever and anon, the ominous cross, the monument of robbery and murder, erected on a mound of stones at some lonely part of the road, admonishes the traveller that he is among the haunts of banditti, perhaps at that very moment under the eye of some lurking bandolero.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 19, No. 547, May 19, 1832

  • But their united numbers render them secure against petty bands of marauders, and the solitary bandolero, armed to the teeth, and mounted on his Andalusian steed, hovers about them, like a pirate about a merchant convoy, without daring to make an assault.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 19, No. 547, May 19, 1832

  • The couplets thus chanted, are often old traditional romances about the Moors, or some legend of a saint, or some love-ditty; or what is still more frequent, some ballad about a bold contrabandista, or hardy bandolero, for the smuggler and the robber are poetical heroes among the common people of Spain.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 19, No. 547, May 19, 1832

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.