Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or quality of being bearded.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Writing in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the researchers conclude: Facial hair, or beardedness, is a powerful sociosexual signal, and an obvious biological marker of sexual maturity.

    The importance of earnest facial hair

  • If we say that words signify things external to and independent of the mind do we mean that ˜a human being™ and ˜beard™ signify special common objects such as humanity or beardedness, or do we mean that they signify Socrates and his beard?

    Medieval Theories of Analogy

  • But his beardedness, so unknown among her people, his youth, which showed itself more in his figure and in his step than in his weatherworn features, his cloth jerkin and his leather boots, but above all, the strange hue of his face and hands offered enough novelty to satisfy her.

    The Princess Pocahontas

  • This year his beardedness sent out special editions of Monopoly to favoured friends - and to

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • Some perceive beardedness to be merely a hipster fashion - but visiting Minneapolis it becomes apparent that preserving the body's natural hairy coverage is part of an ancient and venerable tradition.

    BC Bloggers

  • Noé Montes on hand to help you experience the thrill of beardedness.

    Wondermark

  • The spooks already got my application, haven’t heard back from them in what, nearly 20 years … … NOW I realise my mistake - I should have mentioned my love of latte and unwashed beardedness instead of impending psychotic episodes and requirement for an Aston Martin.

    Cheeseburger Gothic » Kinda buried.

  • Socrates) and accidents (e.g., the beardedness of Socrates) exist when one is dependent on the other; how can we say that both God and creatures exist, when one is created by the other?

    Medieval Theories of Analogy

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