Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of beauty.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And this is equally true of love, and friendship, and love of country, and delight in what they call the beauties of nature, and most other things worth having.

    Virginibus Puerisque and other papers

  • Not that the Greeks were without a sense of what we call the beauties of nature, but that they treat them habitually, not as the centre of interest, but as the background to human activity.

    The Greek View of Life

  • He cares nothing, for example, for what we call the beauties of nature.

    Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.)

  • He had bedded the pureblooded daughters the kings of Stygia, Shem, and Koth, more Amazonian snow-skinned beauties from the northern lands than he could recall, and still he could not quash his lust for this most vile woman, viler than the lepers who begged at palace gates.

    Archive 2009-12-01

  • He had bedded the pureblooded daughters the kings of Stygia, Shem, and Koth, more Amazonian snow-skinned beauties from the northern lands than he could recall, and still he could not quash his lust for this most vile woman, viler than the lepers who begged at palace gates.

    Conan Fan Fiction!

  • Thomas Mugridge being duly bribed, the galley is pleasantly areek with the odour of their frying; while dolphin meat is served fore and aft on such occasions as Johnson catches the blazing beauties from the bowsprit end.

    Chapter 7

  • The Georgicks with all its beauties is allmost a bawdy story — I will soon send you Wordsworth's poems, if there is no poetry in them I will give up my pretension to feeling and Nature.

    Letter 52

  • Their appreciation of the city's few beauties is acute: the Shwe Dagon Pagoda, the several lovely cathedrals, the Scott Market, the flowering trees in Maha

    Burma

  • Their appreciation of the city's few beauties is acute: the Shwe Dagon Pagoda, the several lovely cathedrals, the Scott Market, the flowering trees in Maha

    Burma

  • In the morning, Thomas Mugridge being duly bribed, the galley is pleasantly areek with the odor of their frying; while dolphin meat is served fore and aft on such occasions as Johnson catches the blazing beauties from the bowsprit end.

    Chapter 7

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