Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Nautical Either of two beams or fins fastened lengthwise along the outside of a ship's bilge to inhibit heavy rolling.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a strake, or small keel or blister, running along much of the length of the hull. It is used to reduce the hull's tendency to roll. They are typically fitted one on each side, low down on the side of the hull, so as not to increase the draft of the vessel. In battleships they were often quite large and used as part of the torpedo protection system.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a keel peculiar to ironclad vessels, extending only a portion of the length of the vessel under the bilges.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Nautical, a piece of timber fastened edgewise under the bottom of a ship, for the purpose of keeping her from rolling heavily and from drifting to leeward. Also called bilgepiece.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. either of two lengthwise fins attached along the outside of a ship's bilge; reduces rolling

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Sorry, no example sentences found.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • A strake (small keel or blister), welded along much of the length of a ship's hull at the turn of the bilge, that helps reduce the hull's tendency to roll. Bilge keels are typically fitted one on each side, low on the side of the hull, to avoid increasing the draft of the vessel.

    August 21, 2009