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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Joe had half-fallen a couple of yards behind J.B.: he came up on one knee, his black face demonically contorted with rage and pain, mouthing curses that were lost in the uproar.

    Flashman and the angel of the lord

  • I didn’t say anything; I just looked upinto her beautiful black face and those dark, dark eyes, slightly scrunched up in concentration.

    Walls of Silence

  • Danny read every suspicious black face he spoke to for signs of holding back; all he got was a sense that these guys thought Marty Goines was a lily-white fool.

    The Big Nowhere

  • The sight of Lulu’s black face and happy grin seemed to surprise the inspector, but, reassured by his companion’s unperturbed explanation of his business, he took off his hat, and, carefully wiping his boots, followed her into the hall, where both females immediately deserted him, Lulu to find Mrs Bradley, the secretary to return to College.

    Laurels are Poison

  • Page 108 was about to drop into sleep that night I was aroused by steps ascending the stairs, soon my door opened and Mrs. Horne's negroe woman thrust first her hand holding the candle and then her black face into the room.

    Diary, August 8, 1859-May 15, 1865.

  • How we wept and clung together, her tear-wet black face pressed against my rosy one — the best, the truest, the tenderest friend that ever a woman claimed!

    A southern woman's war time reminiscences,

  • Constantinople.] 53 See Cantemir, p. 37 — 41, with his own large and curious annotations.] 54 White and black face are common and proverbial expressions of praise and reproach in the

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • In my condition, his wrinkled black face and short white beard looked strangely unfamiliar, as if I'd just bumped into him in a Palanthas market.

    Father Swarat

  • We passed up near the statue of St. Peter, who was to-day dressed out in his papal robes, his black face (for it is of bronze) looking rather frightful from beneath the splendid tiara which crowned his head, and the scarlet-and-gold tissue of his robes.

    Letters and Journals 01

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