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Etymologies

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Examples

  • He has belonged, too, a good deal to my Lord Chesterfield, to whom I believe he owes this new honour, "that of being minister at the Hague," as he had before made him black-rod in Ireland, and gave the ingenious reason that he had a black face. '

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Volume 1

  • Duke of Richmond bearing the sword; and having reached the upper step, prostrated himself on the cushion, while the black-rod bending the knee delivered a chain of gold, intended afterwards to be redeemed, to the

    Windsor Castle

  • As soon as the king and the knights were seated, intimation was given by an usher to the black-rod that the newly elected knight, Lord Rochford, was without.

    Windsor Castle

  • The prelate and the chancellor stood at the upper end of the table; the Garter and register at the foot; while the door was kept by the black-rod.

    Windsor Castle

  • The black-rod next descended, and proceeding towards the altar, a groom of the wardrobe brought him a small carpet of cloth of gold, and a cushion of the same stuff, which were placed on the larger carpet, the cushion being set on the head of the steps.

    Windsor Castle

  • The door of the chapter-house being closed by the black-rod, the king proceeded to the upper end of the vestments-board -- as the table was designated -- where a chair, cushions, and cloth of state were provided for him; the knights-companions, whose stalls in the choir were on the same side as his own, seating themselves on his right, and those whose posts were on the prince's side taking their places on the left.

    Windsor Castle

  • I was in the House of Lords when her majesty came down for the last time, and saw her handed up the stairs by the usher of the black-rod, a little stumpy man, wonderful particular about the rules of the House, insomuch that he was almost angry with me for stopping at the stair-head.

    The Ayrshire Legatees, or, the Pringle family

  • The black-rod I hope, like a herald, is a sacred personage.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 3

  • He has belonged, too, a good deal to my Lord Chesterfield, to whom, I believe, he owes this new honour; as he had before made him black-rod in

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 1

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