Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. adipose tissue

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

body +‎ fat

Examples

  • Ryan Reynolds sigh in the atrocious 'Blade Trinity' had this sort of physique with only 3% bodyfat, which is classed as malnutrition.

    Those Abs Just CAN'T Be Real!

  • The way your body stores this energy is called bodyfat, and your body loves it.

    EzineArticles

  • Mike Hansberry says: whit: i have to agree. 33+ standard deviations difference? noWAY. the sad thing is that people are so unfamiliar with basic math concepts that they can read something like that and not go “WTF?” it is as unbelievable as a statement like “in 2 days, mary gained 350 lbs of bodyfat”. people would go WTF? if they saw that, and rightly so

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The “Racist” Charge

  • Check out all the images ever made of him and he's at least 235lbs+ at under 10 percent bodyfat.

    John Krasinski is the Top Choice for Captain America? | /Film

  • So the obvious understanding of 'eat X number of calories and put out X number of ergs, and you will lose X weight of bodyfat in X amount of time' is well-intended but assumes the human body is a simple Newtonian machine, which it isn't.

    Why Live?

  • You can have a bodyfat percentage less than somebody who just won the Mr. Olympia contest and be considered obese or even morbidly obese, using nothing but a height/weight ratio.

    Why Live?

  • In general, less caloric input and more energy output will reduce bodyfat.

    Why Live?

  • I do 100 crunches and planks every day, got myself down to 12% bodyfat, cycle 100 miles a week and have a full head of hair and you guys think Kaus is cute?

    Mickey Kaus asks "Does she know the guy?"

  • I do 100 crunches and planks every day, got myself down to 12% bodyfat, cycle 100 miles a week and have a full head of hair and you guys think Kaus is cute

    Mickey Kaus asks "Does she know the guy?"

  • Thus, while approbation for the less fit is a great idea, the actions that would be required to get a *true* measure of one's fitness going into the eventgetting someone to step on a scale, bodyfat composition testing, etc would probably deter many from participating.

    Economics and charity runs, Eric Crampton | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

Comments

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