Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Wood that has been preserved in a peat bog.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as bog-oak.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The wood of trees, esp. of oaks, dug up from peat bogs. It is of a shining black or ebony color, and is largely used for making ornaments.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The dark, shiny wood of trees, especially oaks, dug up from peat bogs, sometimes used for making ornaments.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

bog +‎ wood

Examples

  • The door through which one enters Masa is made of 2,000-year-old Japanese bogwood.

    If You Knew Sushi

  • The door through which one enters Masa is made of 2,000-year-old Japanese bogwood.

    If You Knew Sushi

  • For the face of the Colonel was hard and stern as a block of bogwood oak; and though the men might pity me and think me unjustly executed, yet they must obey their orders, or themselves be put to death.

    Lorna Doone

  • At the far end of the room was a second door, which stood half open; a bogwood fire burned on a hearth somewhat less rude than the one which I had first seen, but still very little better appointed with a chimney, for thick wreaths of smoke were eddying, with every fitful gust, about the room.

    The Purcell Papers

  • But behind them, and I should say in unpleasant proximity (for the peasantry do not carry handkerchiefs scented with White Rose or Jockey Club, -- only the odor of the peat and the bogwood), surged a vast crowd of men and women, on whose lips and in whose hearts was a prayer for her who was entering on the momentous change in her sweet and tranquil life.

    My New Curate

  • No fuel would serve for a candle which has not the property of giving this cup, except such fuel as the Irish bogwood, where the material itself is like a sponge and holds its own fuel.

    The Chemical History of a Candle

  • No fuel would serve for a candle which has not the property of giving this cup, except such fuel as the Irish bogwood, where the material itself is like a sponge, and holds its own fuel.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • Some one struck a light and illuminated a branch of bogwood which he held above his head as a torch.

    The Northern Iron

  • A brooch with a miniature portrait sustained a bogwood watch-chain upon her bosom, and at her elbow lay a heap of knitting and an old copy of

    The House of the Dead Hand

  • A brooch with a miniature portrait sustained a bogwood watch-chain upon her bosom, and at her elbow lay a heap of knitting and an old copy of The Queen.

    The House of the Dead Hand

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