Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The art or practice of setting bones.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • All his massages are intended to "fix" a muscle problem (and in the case of his bone-setting skills, to "fix" or reduce a fracture).

    Massage Exchange With A Traditional Maya Massage Therapist

  • Following this accident, the Deschamps brothers, who had bone-setting and nursing skills, came to live in the Pascal household at Rouen for three months.

    Blaise Pascal

  • Among the good company which had attended in the hall during the bone-setting, Mrs. Honour was one; who being summoned to her mistress as soon as it was over, and asked by her how the young gentleman did, presently launched into extravagant praises on the magnanimity, as she called it, of his behaviour, which, she said,

    The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • There are still a few old men and women who know the ancient bone-setting and wound-cauterizing techniques, but that kind of medicine is dying out along with its practitioners.

    Coyote Medicine

  • "We don't know for certain that there's a bone-setting kit at the Outpost, and I prefer not to take the chance that the last few teams have been as certain of their invulnerability as you."

    The Silver Gryphon

  • If the pain she'd suffered from his inept bone-setting was less than that of child-bearing, he didn't want to be around any birthings anytime soon.

    The Order War

  • Amberdrake was taught surgical techniques, the compounding of medicines from herbs and minerals, bone-setting, diagnoses, and more.

    The Black Gryphon

  • I had brought her a car crash, a man with a pitchfork, a bone-setting, and a murder.

    Knockdown

  • No! If my uncle himself showed up at this moment, I should refuse to leave you until I saw how my amateur bone-setting turned out.

    A Mating in the Wilds

  • Among the good company which had attended in the hall during the bone-setting, Mrs. Honour was one; who being summoned to her mistress as soon as it was over, and asked by her how the young gentleman did, presently launched into extravagant praises on the magnanimity, as she called it, of his behaviour, which, she said, “was so charming in so pretty a creature.

    XIV. The Arrival of a Surgeon. Book IV

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