Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of bootjack.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of bootjack.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Emaline had tried without success to get him to use one of the three bootjacks on the back porch to take his boots off.

    Come Again No More

  • Emaline had tried without success to get him to use one of the three bootjacks on the back porch to take his boots off.

    Come Again No More

  • Emaline had tried without success to get him to use one of the three bootjacks on the back porch to take his boots off.

    Come Again No More

  • They are born to be our greatest comforts and conveniences; our — our moral bootjacks, as it were; and to men in your way of life, believe me such a person would be invaluable.

    The Memoires of Barry Lyndon

  • The gabble of geese is music to the goose; the hoot of the hoot-owl is lovlier to his mate than the nightingale's lay; the concert of Signor "Tomasso Cataleny" and Mademoiselle "Pussy" awakeneth the growling old bachelor from his dreams, and he throweth his boquets of bootjacks and superannuated foot gear.

    Gov. Bob. Taylor's Tales

  • We installed bookshelves, bootjacks, a sideboard, hat racks, a dumb waiter, a stand for the gramophone and a roll-top desk for the Major.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 153, December 5, 1917

  • No fathers wear boots in this era, and bootjacks are as extinct as the dodo.

    A Backward Glance at Eighty

  • To his groping hands they felt not unlike double-headed bootjacks.

    The Return of Tarzan

  • To his groping hands they felt not unlike double-headed bootjacks.

    Return of Tarzan

  • I had, during my college life, known sundry college tutors seriously injured while thus doing police duty; I have seen a professor driven out of a room, through the panel of a door, with books, boots, and bootjacks hurled at his head; and even the respected president of a college, a doctor of divinity, while patrolling buildings with the janitors, subjected to outrageous indignity.

    Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White, Volume I

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