Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of a group of viruses, of the genus Bornavirus, responsible for Borna disease

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The invader is called bornavirus, a brain-infecting pathogen that was first identified in 1970s.

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  • The invader is called bornavirus, a brain-infecting pathogen that was first identified in

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  • The invader is called bornavirus, a brain-infecting pathogen that was first identified in

    Yahoo! News: Latest news headlines News Headlines | Top Stories

  • Our results provide the first evidence for endogenization of non-retroviral virus-derived elements in mammalian genomes and give novel insights not only into generation of endogenous elements, but also into a role of bornavirus as a source of genetic novelty in its host.

    A New Wrinkle on Parasitic Elements

  • We also show that the N mRNA of a current mammalian bornavirus, Borna disease virus (BDV), can form EBLN-like elements in the genomes of persistently infected cultured cells.

    A New Wrinkle on Parasitic Elements

  • Here we show that elements homologous to the nucleoprotein (N) gene of bornavirus exist in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents and elephants.

    A New Wrinkle on Parasitic Elements

  • He speculates that bornavirus could be another source of human mutations, especially in neurons.

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  • In the new study, researchers led by Keizo Tomonaga of Osaka University found that two human genes are similar to the bornavirus N gene.

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  • In laboratory experiments, Tomonaga's team found that modern bornavirus can integrate into the DNA of human, monkey, rat and dog cells.

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  • "Clearly they provide a fossil record of bornavirus that was previously only available for retroviruses," says John Coffin, a virologist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who coauthored the study.

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