Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of butler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A book entitled "Ffor to serve a Lorde," in 1500, directs the "boteler" or "panter," to bring forth the principal salt, and to "set the saler in the myddys of the table."

    Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages A Description of Mediaeval Workmanship in Several of the Departments of Applied Art, Together with Some Account of Special Artisans in the Early Renaissance

  • “The boteler will serve ye with wine, Hombourg,” said the Margrave gloomily from the end of the table: not even an invitation to drink! how different was this from the old times!

    A Legend of the Rhine

  • Thenne ayenst tyme of mete, the boteler or the ewer shall brynge forthe clenly dressed and fayre applyed [3] Tabill-clothis, and the cubbord-clothe, cowched uppon his lefte shulder, laying them uppon the tabill ende, close applied [4] unto the tyme that he have firste coverd the cubbord; and thenne cover the syde-tabillis, and laste the principall tabill with dobell clothe drau {n}, cowched, and spradde unto the degre, as longeth therto in festis.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Thenne here-uppon the boteler or panter shall bring forthe his pryncipall salte, and iiij or v loves of paryd brede, havyng a towaile aboute his nekke, the tone half honge or lying uppon his lefte arme unto his hande, and the kervyng knyves holdyng in the ryght hande, iuste unto the salte-seler beryng.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Thenne the boteler shall bryng forth basyns, ewers, and cuppis,

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • Thenne the boteler or panter shall sette the seler in the myddys of the tabull accordyng to the place where the principall soverain shalle sette, and sette his brede iuste couched unto the salte-seler; and yf ther be trenchours of brede, sette them iuste before the seler, and lay downe faire the kervyng knyves, the poynts to the seler benethe the trenchours.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • But when in compliance with this order the boteler proceeded to hand round the mantling vintage of the Cape to the assembled party, and to fill young Otto's goblet, (which the latter held up with the eagerness of youth,) the Margrave's rage knew no bounds.

    Burlesques

  • "The boteler will serve ye with wine, Hombourg," said the Margrave gloomily from the end of the table: not even an invitation to drink! how different was this from the old times!

    Burlesques

  • [b]  then the boteler shall avoyde the cupborde, begynnyng at the lowest, p {ro} cede in rule to the hieste, and bere hit in-to his office.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • But when in compliance with this order the boteler proceeded to hand round the mantling vintage of the Cape to the assembled party, and to fill young Otto’s goblet, (which the latter held up with the eagerness of youth,) the Margrave’s rage knew no bounds.

    A Legend of the Rhine

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