Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as boulder, of which it is the older form.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And then she put her face down upon the boulder-stone and kissed it.

    Can You Forgive Her?

  • The best defended camp was surrounded by bush abatis and flanked by half-moon _sungas_ of boulder-stone work, which held the sentries.

    Afghanistan and the Anglo-Russian Dispute

  • His eye seizes the crisp indentations of ferns as they “fit their teeth to the polished block” of a grey boulder-stone; [74] seizes the “sharp-curled” olive-leaves as they

    Robert Browning

  • So she led him into a courtyard where stood a great boulder-stone.

    The Yellow Fairy Book

  • That great boulder-stone at the north-eastern end of the magnificent avenue opposite is, most likely, a Roman landmark, though it is customary to declare that the Earn once flowed past it.

    Chronicles of Strathearn

  • Let me attempt in a few paragraphs to give some faint idea of the impression which this city, a boulder-stone left by the icedrift of the dissolving Empire amid the green fields of modern civilisation, produces on the mind of a traveller.

    Theodoric the Goth Barbarian Champion of Civilisation

  • The old grey boulder-stone that has finished its peregrination from the rock to the valley, is as easily to be set rolling up again as these men laughing.

    Complete Short Works of George Meredith

  • By his feet was a rounded boulder-stone, brown and smooth, a hard sarsen; this he tried to move, but it was so heavy that he could but just stir it.

    Wood Magic A Fable

  • With now and then a smooth grey rock, or large boulder-stone, which had somehow inexplicably stopped on the brow of the hill instead of rolling down into what at some former time no doubt was a bed of water, – all this open strip of the table-land might have stood with very little coaxing for a piece of a gentleman's pleasure-ground.

    Queechy

  • With now and then a smooth grey rock, or large boulder-stone which had somehow inexplicably stopped on the brow of the hill instead of rolling down into what at some former time no doubt was a bed of water, -- all this open strip of the table-land might have stood with very little coaxing for a piece of a gentleman's pleasure-ground.

    Queechy

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