Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • See burgeon.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To sprout; to put forth buds; to shoot forth, as a branch.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb obsolete To sprout; to put forth buds; to shoot forth, as a branch.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb produce buds, branches, or germinate

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

See burgeon.

Examples

  • Beyond this function, the future of capitalism is threaten by bourgeon power of an assertive and interventionist government.

    Emerging economies must reject handouts and bailouts capitalism

  • Beyond this function, the future of capitalism is threaten by bourgeon power of an assertive and interventionist government.

    Emerging economies must reject handouts and bailouts capitalism

  • In town, with the noise of the streets, the buzz of the theatres and the lights of the ballroom, they were living lives where the heart expands, the senses bourgeon out.

    Madame Bovary

  • Statistics bourgeon into prophecies under his pen: he does not disdain their significance, but rather aids their influence with all the power which his spasmodic style has given in drawing our grotesque-loving public to him.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 1, January 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • There is a touch of humanity in it, and always some germ of sympathy will bourgeon and bloom around the once populous abodes of men, whether they were tenanted by the pure or by the impure.

    Acadia or, A Month with the Blue Noses

  • Their problems began to bourgeon immediately after they left New

    We Can't Have Everything

  • Shall bourgeon with fresh leaves, or spread a shadowing bough,

    The Aeneid of Virgil Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor

  • In town, with the noise of the streets, the buzz of the theatres and the lights of the ballroom, they were living lives where the heart expands, the senses bourgeon out.

    Madame Bovary

  • It is all fertile now, the richest plain, and even then, corn and wine must have been in full bourgeon, the great fresh greenness of the big leaves coming out upon such low stumps of vine as were left in the soil; but the devastated country was in those days covered with a wild growth like the/macchia/of Italian wilds, which half hid the movements of the expedition.

    Jeanne d'Arc

  • Pember Street, E., is never very cheerful in appearance, not even in mid-spring, when the dingy lilacs in the forecourts of those grimy houses bourgeon and blossom.

    Hurricane Island

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.