Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of several very large herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs of the family Brachiosauridae of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Periods, having a long neck, small head, and front legs longer than the hind legs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any herbivorous dinosaur of the family Brachiosauridae.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From New Latin Brāchiosauridae, family name, from Brāchiosaurus, type genus; see brachiosaurus.]

Examples

  • In March 2000 Matt published (with co-authors Richard Cifelli and R. Kent Sanders) his preliminary description of a giant brachiosaurid from the Antlers Formation of Oklahoma, named Sauroposeidon proteles (Wedel et al. 2000a: download the pdf here).

    Archive 2006-07-01

  • Long-necked Sauroposeidon, for example, may not necessarily have had a body that was, proportionally, as big for its neck as was that of Brachiosaurus [adjacent image, depicting various Wessex Formation dinosaurs including a giant brachiosaurid, is borrowed from my flickr site].

    ‘Angloposeidon’, the unreported story, part III

  • Response to Mickey: I agree that MIWG. 7306 could be named as a metataxon, were it the only named brachiosaurid from the respective unit (the Wessex Formation).

    ‘Angloposeidon’, the unreported story, part IV

  • Long-necked Sauroposeidon, for example, may not necessarily have had a body that was, proportionally, as big for its neck as was that of Brachiosaurus [adjacent image, depicting various Wessex Formation dinosaurs including a giant brachiosaurid, is borrowed from my flickr site].

    Archive 2006-07-01

  • In March 2000 Matt published (with co-authors Richard Cifelli and R. Kent Sanders) his preliminary description of a giant brachiosaurid from the Antlers Formation of Oklahoma, named Sauroposeidon proteles (Wedel et al. 2000a: download the pdf here).

    ‘Angloposeidon’, the unreported story, part I

  • The most exciting among these may be a new tyrannosarid, Bistahieversor sealeyi, from the Late Cretaceous of New Mexico, and a new brachiosaurid, Abydosaurus mcintoshi, from relatively older Late Cretaceous beds in Utah.

    Meet Abydosaurus and Bistahieversor

  • The most exciting among these may be a new tyrannosarid, Bistahieversor sealeyi, from the Late Cretaceous of New Mexico, and a new brachiosaurid, Abydosaurus mcintoshi, from relatively older Late Cretaceous beds in Utah.

    "If there really was a God here, he'd have raised a hand by now."

  • Feb. 26th, 2010 01: 28 am (UTC) a new tyrannosarid, Bistahieversor sealeyi, from the Late Cretaceous of New Mexico, and a new brachiosaurid, Abydosaurus mcintoshi, from relatively older Late Cretaceous beds in Utah.

    Meet Abydosaurus and Bistahieversor

  • Hi Darren! why Ultrasauros didn´t exist??? because curtice said that??, many paleontologist have examinated the dorsal vertebrae for years and all of them said that it was very closed to the brachiosaurus brancai of naturkunde museum. is any paleontologist to day that defend that ultrasaurs is real, that the vertebrae is of a brachiosaurid?

    Biggest…. sauropod…. ever (part…. I)

  • Hi Darren! why Ultrasauros didn´t exist??? because curtice said that??, many paleontologist have examinated the dorsal vertebrae for years and all of them said that it was very closed to the brachiosaurus brancai of naturkunde museum. is any paleontologist to day that defend that ultrasaurs is real, that the vertebrae is of a brachiosaurid?

    Biggest…. sauropod…. ever (part…. I)

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.