Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of brander.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The greed of the King "branders" was rearing its really unbecoming head once again in light of "the sudden wave of T-shirts, posters and other merchandise depicting the civil rights leader alongside Barack Obama":

    LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION®

  • Although Marmite's dichotomous fan base may be unique, many branders can learn from Marmite's social media strategies both on Facebook and other social platforms.

    Playing The Spread

  • Denyard sees social networking as, "an exciting, democratizing process," and reminds his fellow branders of the importance of keeping faith with the network.

    Playing The Spread

  • For Denyard and his team, successfully leveraging social networks demands honesty and a commitment to authenticity that would send many Facebook branders screaming back to the relatively tranquil world of analog-based communication.

    Playing The Spread

  • Slick branders speak a hi-toned language to make Senior VPs, all of whom are worried about their jobs, go "Man we gotta do this now!"

    Richard Laermer: Sy Fy: The Latest Mess From Another Stupid Branding Company

  • From the very beginning, the brand was developed alongside our dynamic girl audience, who we consider co-branders with us.

    Elizabeth Wiatt: Mother of Fashionable Invention

  • Corporate branders have morphed the 161-year-old non-profit news cooperative into "AP 2.0," a name that prompts more chuckles than Paris Hilton.

    Mort Rosenblum: AP 2.0: Losing Eyes and Ears in a Perilous World

  • And in a city of self-branders, her services — which “are up there with the higher end, you might say,” as she put it, in terms of price, and include access to her Rolodex, her bubbly enthusiasm and her personal aesthetic — are in ever-increasing demand.

    Gimme Schelter!

  • One of his latest initiatives is the creation of the ultimate anti-brand: Blackspot sneakers, an un-branded, ultra-ethical line of shoes (made of organic hemp and recycled tires, sweatshop free) launched as an attack on branding itself (and "hyper-branders" like Nike, McDonald's and Starbucks).

    Polly LaBarre: Don't Buy It

  • Like all good branders, Unilever, in both cases, narrowed their focus, got to know their specific customers intimately and did a lot of research.

    Andrea Learned: Cause Marketing and Branding: The Odd Couple Needs Counseling

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