Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Obsolete form of branch.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Moreover, if we are going to admit subjective considerations, there is a fascination in the bleak logic that pervades all of life, including wasps homing in on the nerve ganglia down the length of their prey, cuckoos ejecting their foster brothers ‘Thow mortherer of the heysugge on y braunche’, slave-making ants, and the single-minded – or rather zero-minded – indifference to suffering shown by all parasites and predators.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • Moreover, if we are going to admit subjective considerations, there is a fascination in the bleak logic that pervades all of life, including wasps homing in on the nerve ganglia down the length of their prey, cuckoos ejecting their foster brothers ‘Thow mortherer of the heysugge on y braunche’, slave-making ants, and the single-minded – or rather zero-minded – indifference to suffering shown by all parasites and predators.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • For the ravenes and the crowes and the choughes, and other foules of the contree assemblen hem there every zeer ones, and fleen thider as in pilgrymage: and eyeryche of hem bringethe a braunche of the bayes or of olyve, in here bekes, in stede of offryng, and leven hem there; of the whiche the monkes maken gret plentee of oyle; and this is a gret marvaylle.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And the storye of Noe wytnessethe, whan that the culver14 broughte the braunche of olyve, that betokened pes made betwene God and man.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And therfore hathe white thorn many vertues: for he that berethe a braunche on him thereoffe, no thondre ne no maner of tempest may dere him; ne in the hows, that it is inne, may non evylle gost entre ne come unto the place that it is inne.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And therfore hathe white thorn many vertues: for he that berethe a braunche on him thereoffe, no thondre ne no maner of tempest may dere him; ne in the hows, that it is inne, may non evylle gost entre ne come unto the place that it is inne.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • For the ravenes and the crowes and the choughes, and other foules of the contree assemblen hem there every zeer ones, and fleen thider as in pilgrymage: and eyeryche of hem bringethe a braunche of the bayes or of olyve, in here bekes, in stede of offryng, and leven hem there; of the whiche the monkes maken gret plentee of oyle; and this is a gret marvaylle.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • And the storye of Noe wytnessethe, whan that the culver460 broughte the braunche of olyve, that betokened pes made betwene God and man.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • "The most pestiferous and deadly Heresie of all others, because there is not almost any one particular erroneous and schismaticall phantasie, whereof the _Familie of Loue_ hath not borrowed one braunche or other thereof, to peece vnto themselves this their Religion."

    Notes and Queries, Number 43, August 24, 1850

  • Sweet is the Firbloome, but his braunche is rough;

    Amoretti and Epithalamion

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