Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Something brewed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Malt liquor; drink brewed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A mixed drink; drink brewed or prepared in any way.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. drink made by steeping and boiling and fermenting rather than distilling

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

brew +‎ -age

Examples

  • But this beastly contraption of coffee brewage refuses to obey commands of speeding up.

    alyssan-aria Diary Entry

  • Mad brewage set to work Their brains, no doubt, like galley-slaves the Turk Pits for his pastime, Christians against Jews.

    The Dark Tower

  • And they teach the serpents there to entwine themselves up on long sticks out of the ground and of the scales of these serpents they brew out a brewage like to mead.

    Ulysses

  • She did not like the morning cup of coffee; its school brewage not being strong or sweet enough to suit her palate; and she had an excellent appetite, like any other healthy school-girl, for the morning pistolets or rolls, which were new-baked and very good, and of which a certain allowance was served to each.

    Villette

  • Already the children were clenching idle hands and drinking in a bitter cup the poisoned brewage of doubt.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • Make the brewage sure, quick, decisive; there must be no mistake about it.

    Saronia A Romance of Ancient Ephesus

  • But it was not filled with the brewage; its contents were harmless.

    Saronia A Romance of Ancient Ephesus

  • She kneeled hastily at his side, and put the enchanted brewage to his lips, but he could neither drink nor speak, for he was dead, as I have told you.

    French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France

  • The varlet took the maiden in his arms, but first he gave her the flask with the precious brewage to carry, since for pride he might not endure to drink therefrom, save at utmost peril.

    French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France

  • The curious “white ale, ” or lober agol—which, within the memory of man, used to exist in Devonshire and Cornwall, but which, even half a century ago, I have vainly sought there—was, I believe, drunk quite new; but then it was not pure malt and not hopped at all, but had eggs (“pulletsperm in the brewage”) and other foreign bodies in it.

    Beer and Cider

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