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Examples

  • The bride's bulimia an episode the previous night, the bridegroom's mistress: how could we have known, what gave us the right to know?

    Royal wedding then, and now

  • She's everything Annie isn't: a wealthy, well-organized and polished member of the country club set, married to the bridegroom's boss.

    Dr. Irene S. Levine: 'Bridesmaids': Overpromise Left Me Feeling Flat

  • Oh dear … Watch out for our boy Becks buttonholing the bridegroom's father some time on Friday and asking what that was all about, Charlie boy?

    Royalty has finally become wedded to the national sporting obsession | Frank Keating

  • Men, women, children, and dogs gorged to repletion, nor was there one person, even among the chance visitors and stray hunters from other tribes, who failed to receive some token of the bridegroom's largess.

    THE MARRIAGE TO LIT-LIT

  • The bridegroom's doors are opened wide, and I am next of kin.

    EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT 2/5: The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar

  • Their business was to get the reluctant bride safely to Bangor and her bridegroom's arms, and there were no Danish ships as near as Bangor, nor likely to be.

    His Disposition

  • She looked towards her bridegroom's land, the man against whom she knew nothing, of whom she had heard nothing but good; she saw marriage advancing upon her all too rapidly, and there was such a baffled and resentful sadness in her face, and such an obstinate rejection of her fate, that Cadfael marvelled no one else felt her burning outrage, and turned in alarm to find the source of this intense disquiet.

    His Disposition

  • I stood automatically when it came time for the vows, watching in a sort of numbed fascination as my chilly fingers disappeared into my bridegroom's substantial grasp.

    Sick Cycle Carousel

  • In this case, however, burning the animal bridegroom's skin had adverse consequences.

    Oriental Myths and Legends by W. W. Gibbings

  • But first he must rewrite Hopkins's poem, to show that the five nuns drowned in the shipwreck acted cowardly in some final opéra bouffe, and that Hopkins then rewrote their deaths as "an almost erotic apprehension of the spiritual bridegroom's masterful descent on his virginal supplicant," so that "Christ's death-dealing becomes one of Hopkins's most powerful versions of his recurrent fantasy of simultaneous rape and redemption."

    'The Poet & the Wreck': An Exchange

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