Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Resembling or characteristic of a bride.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

bride +‎ -like

Examples

  • Marie had just left her in despair and bewilderment, after trying to make her look as bridelike as possible when she did not wish to look bridelike.

    The Triflers

  • "That sounds very pretty and bridelike, Gertie, but I'm afraid it will be expensive."

    A Woman Rice Planter

  • Free from man's disfiguring touch, pure, immaculate, it appeared bridelike through a veil of morning mist.

    The Woman Who Toils Being the Experiences of Two Gentlewomen as Factory Girls

  • "No, I do not want to be too youthfully dressed, or to look too bridelike on my wedding tour; so I think I will have a dark navy blue."

    Elsie at the World's Fair

  • She wore a white silk trimmed with a great deal of very rich lace, white flowers in her hair and at her throat, and looked very bridelike and beautiful.

    Grandmother Elsie

  • He and the schoolmaster had been very intimate about this time; but we know not how it happened that soon afterwards he felt a modest bridelike reluctance in meeting with that afflicted gentleman.

    Phelim Otoole's Courtship and Other Stories Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of William Carleton, Volume Three

  • And the forest, -- it seemed an impenetrable mystery, a strange tangle of fantastic growths: the live-oak (chene vert), its wide-spreading limbs hung funereally with Spanish moss and twined in the mistletoe's death embrace; the dark cypress swamp with the conelike knees above the yellow back-waters; and here and there grew the bridelike magnolia which we had known in Kentucky, wafting its perfume over the waters, and wondrous flowers and vines and trees with French names that bring back the scene to me even now with a whiff of romance, bois d'arc, lilac, grande volaille (water-lily).

    The Crossing

  • And the forest, -- it seemed an impenetrable mystery, a strange tangle of fantastic growths: the live-oak (chêne vert), its wide-spreading limbs hung funereally with Spanish moss and twined in the mistletoe's death embrace; the dark cypress swamp with the conelike knees above the yellow back-waters; and here and there grew the bridelike magnolia which we had known in Kentucky, wafting its perfume over the waters, and wondrous flowers and vines and trees with French names that bring back the scene to me even now with a whiff of romance, bois d'arc, lilac, grande volaille (water-lily).

    The Crossing

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