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Examples

  • But, we found the night to be a dangerous time for such navigation, on account of the eddies and rapids, and it was therefore settled next day that in future we would bring-to at sunset, and encamp on the shore.

    The Perils of Certain English Prisoners

  • But, we found the night to be a dangerous time for such navigation, on account of the eddies and rapids, and it was therefore settled next day that in future we would bring-to at sunset, and encamp on the shore.

    The Perils of Certain English Prisoners

  • After an action of four hours he had captured an eighty-four and a seventy-four, and then thought it necessary to bring-to the squadron, for the purpose of securing their prizes.

    The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson

  • After an action of four hours he had captured an 84 and a 74, and then thought it necessary to bring-to the squadron, for the purpose of securing their prizes.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • Soon after daylight the anchor of the _Juliette_ was lifted and she sailed out of Apia harbour, and by noon, Leota and Pautôe were astonished to see the little craft bring-to abreast of Laulii village, and Marsh and Meredith come on shore.

    The Call Of The South 1908

  • The luggers stood away under the lee of New Ireland, stickin 'in to the land, and tryin' to bring to for shelter, but they were a hundred miles away from me, down the coast, before they could bring-to and anchor, for the blow had settled into a hurricane, and raised such a fearful sea that they had to heave-to for twenty-four hours.

    The Call Of The South 1908

  • It so happened that they had not heard us at all; but the captain, at the earnest request of the ship's cooper, who believed that we had been swamped, and were to leeward, decided to keep away for a short time, and then again bring-to.

    Rídan The Devil And Other Stories 1899

  • To bring-to, (which see), and then to lay some sails aback, in order to keep the ship without movement ahead or astern.

    The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence

  • P.M. At 6.45 Rodney made the signal for the fleet to bring-to (form line and stop) on the port tack, and he remained lying-to during the night, while the French continued to retreat under the orders of the

    The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence

  • "Good: then that's all square, an 'I knows how to lay my course -- up anchor to-morrow mornin', crowd all sail, bear down on the workyard, bring-to off the countin'-room, and open fire on the superintendent."

    The Lighthouse

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