Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of broider.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • During this time Blanche was alone in the grounds, where the women work at their minor occupations, such as broidering and stitching, and often remained in the rooms looking after the washing, putting the clothes tidy, or running about at will.

    Droll Stories — Volume 1

  • Even so did Birdalone, and shaped the skin to her feet; but as she was sewing them a fancy came into her head; for she had just come across some threads of silk of divers colours; so she took them and her shoon and her needle up into the wood, and there sat down happily under a great spreading oak which much she haunted, and fell to broidering the kindly deer-skin.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Furthermore, she took to her broidering again, and fell to doing

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • She was in an inner chamber of Hector's house, weaving a great web of cloth and broidering it with flowers, and she had ordered her handmaidens to heat water for the bath, so that Hector might refresh himself when he came in from the fight.

    The Adventures of Odysseus and The Tales of Troy

  • She was in an inner chamber of Hector’s house, weaving a great web of cloth and broidering it with flowers, and she had ordered her handmaidens to heat water for the bath, so that Hector might refresh himself when he came in from the fight.

    Part I. Chapter XIX

  • People tell us now that chivalry is dead, and women have killed it, bold women who instead of staying at home, broidering pearls on a red velvet sleeve, have gone out to work – have gone to college side by side with men and have been so unwomanly sometimes as to take the prizes away from men.

    In Times Like These

  • She and Li-ti were broidering in the western room, where they could get the last rays of the sun.

    My Lady of the Chinese Courtyard

  • And this conviction, permeating and penetrating his whole literature and broidering itself with an Oriental exuberance of legendary fantasy, poetic or puerile, takes on in places an intimacy, sometimes touching in its tender mysticism, sometimes almost grotesque in its crude reminder to God that after all His own glory and reputation are bound up with His people's, and that He must not go too far in His chastisements lest the heathen mock.

    Chosen Peoples Being the First "Arthur Davis Memorial Lecture" delivered before the Jewish Historical Society at University College on Easter-Passover Sunday, 1918/5678

  • "Not far off it," murmured Delaine, as he looked out on the vast field of wheat they were passing -- a field two miles long, flat and green and bare as a billiard-table -- and remembered the chestnuts and the looping vines, the patches of silky corn and spiky maize, and all the interlacing richness and broidering of the Italian plain.

    Lady Merton, Colonist

  • Here we have ballads like those that Coleridge and Keats conceived on occasion, full of the beauty that lends itself so kindly to painted-glass decoration; clustered spear-shafts, crested helms and curling banners, and everywhere lily hands combing yellow hair or broidering silken standards.

    The Influence of Old Norse Literature on English Literature

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