Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A weedy annual composite, Parthenium Histerophorus, of tropical America.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cadfael gave no sign of having noticed more than he should, but said his farewell cheerfully at the gate, beside the broom-bush that bore blue flowers instead of gold, and set off at a swinging pace back along the path by which he had come.

    The Leper of Saint Giles

  • For it was an unmistakable broom-bush, and yet in this autumn season it was in flower, and its flowers, scattered and starry, were of a bright and limpid blue instead of gold.

    The Leper of Saint Giles

  • Instantly his eye was caught by a broom-bush on the inner side, in a corner near the gate.

    The Leper of Saint Giles

  • Miss Betty had found under the broom-bush had something more than common in him, and that whoever and whatever had offended the eerie creature, he had taken the luck of Lingborough with him when he went away.

    Tales from Many Sources Vol. V

  • But by the time she returned with her sister and the parson, he was quite happy again, gazing up with dark eyes full of delight into the glowing broom-bush, and fighting the evening breeze with his feet, which were entangled in the folds of the yellow cloth, and with the battered toadstool which was still in his hand.

    Lob Lie-by-the-Fire: or The Luck of Lingborough

  • An 'says I-- for I wantit to ken whether I was sic a breme-buss (broom-bush) as I used to be -- says I, "Hoo are ye, Jock Mitchell?"

    Robert Falconer

  • When they reached the open road, Robert laid his violin carefully into a broom-bush.

    Robert Falconer

  • He had not learned to read Wordsworth; yet not a wind blew through a broom-bush, but it blew a joy from it into his heart.

    Alec Forbes of Howglen

  • But when it was proved that the tramp-boy had stolen nothing, when all search for him was vain, and when prosperity faded from the place season by season and year by year, there were old folk who whispered that the gaudily-clothed child Miss Betty had found under the broom-bush had something more than common in him, and that whoever and whatever had offended the eerie creature, he had taken the luck of Lingborough with him when he went away.

    Lob Lie-by-the-Fire: or The Luck of Lingborough

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