Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of several species of large birds, found in Australia and New Guinea, in the megapode (turkey-like) family Megapodiidae.

Etymologies

From: brush + turkey (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Bruijn's brush-turkey (Aepypodius bruijnii) and the western crowned pigeon (Goura cristata) are considered vulnerable.

    Vogelkop-Aru lowland rain forests

  • To the mainland many of the birds and animals of the country are altogether confined; the Birds of paradise, the black cockatoo, the great brush-turkey, and the cassowary, are none of them found on Wamma or any of the detached islands.

    The Malay Archipelago

  • It is the flesh of the brush-turkey, a wild fowl which the bushmen or blackfellows bring in here to market.

    Around the World in Ten Days

  • Once he was savagely pecked by an angry brush-turkey and forced to defend himself.

    "Where Angels Fear to Tread" and Other Stories of the Sea

  • It proved to be a brush-turkey, which he forthwith proceeded to pluck and prepare for the spit; lighting a fire meanwhile, so that it might burn well up and be in a fit state for cooking when wanted.

    The Missing Merchantman

  • I suppose the Talegallus -- the best-known brush-turkey -- must be looked on as an exception to all other birds with regard to the point I am considering; for this abnormal form buries its eggs in the huge mound made by the male, and troubles herself no more about them.

    The Naturalist in La Plata

  • Birds of paradise, the black cockatoo, the great brush-turkey, and the cassowary, are none of them found on Wamma or any of the detached islands.

    The Malay Archipelago, the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise; a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature — Volume 2

  • The latter said that he believed they were a species of the "brush-turkey," often found in New South Wales, and that their flesh was excellent.

    The South Sea Whaler

  • As they advanced they discovered our brush-turkey pen, and, greatly to our distress, some of them instantly stooped over, and began to seize the birds, and to fasten them by their legs round their waists.

    In the Eastern Seas

  • Overhead were numbers of cockatoos, parrots, and other birds of gay plumage, while now and then we caught sight of a brush-turkey running along rapidly over the ground.

    In the Eastern Seas

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